Paul Fenn

Voyager, a Story of the Bitter and the Sweet

Charlie Forsdick at the helm of Voyager, his 2002 Sun Odyssey 43
Charlie Forsdick at the helm of Voyager, his 2002 Sun Odyssey 43

Yesterday, my son Will celebrated his 13th birthday. Like all parents, I can remember so clearly the day he was born. Then a decade went whizzing by and before I knew it he was 10. And now, I have a teenager on my hands. Wow, time certainly does move along.

Totally by coincidence, I had a call from an old customer of ours, Charlie Forsdick, and learned that Will was not the only one having a 13th birthday, Voyager, a Sun Odyssey 43 was also turning 13. Charlie and Terry Forsdick had taken delivery of their new Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 43 in the Spring of 2002 in Westbrook, CT. Charlie was planning on retiring soon and he and Terry were itchy to throw off the lines and go cruising. “We must have looked at 25-30 boats before deciding to buy the SO 43″ Charlie told me. “Ted Novakowski, who originally sold us Voyager, really did a great job finding us the right boat” he added.

“This was a big project” Ted Novakowski recalls. “Charlie had thought through all the systems vital to the cruising program he was looking to do and given plenty of consideration to comfort aboard over extended periods. The radar arch/dinghy davits was one of the earliest projects to be tackled. There were considerations in both functionality and appearance. Additions and adaptations were managed as the installation progressed. I remember an inch here and a degree there… it was a bit of trial and error but in the end I think the function was just what was hoped for and the appearance was really complimentary to the lines of the boat. I still remember the christening. Charlie and Theresa know how to throw a party and the christening was no exception. Voyager was showcased in a slip outside the marina clubhouse, visible from the street, docks, and water. We all enjoyed a great occasion with food, drink and friends. With the boat as the centerpiece of the day, this really celebrated the beginning of the cruising lifestyle Charlie and Theresa had planned for years.”

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Voyager’s christening party in 2002 at Westbrook Sailing Center in Westbrook, CT. It was a grand day!

A few years went by. Then in 2006, true to their plan, Charlie retired and off they went, full-time… first to the North to explore old haunts; Block Island, Newport, Martha’s Vineyard, Cutty Hunk, Nantucket and then to the south to sit out the winter months in the Bahamas. They did this for many years, up north to New England for the summer, down south to the Bahamas in the winter. A few years ago, they bought a place in Ft. Pierce, FL that they now call home. They continued to cruise however, exploring both coasts of Florida, the Panhandle and the Gulf of Mexico.

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Charlie always had the need for speed as demonstrated in this awesome shot of Voyager sailing close-hauled in a steady 15 knot breeze

Charlie and I spent a good bit of time on the phone reminiscing and talking about all the adventures he and Terry have had over the past 13 years. “It’s really been great Paul. My experience with the boat and the people at Jeanneau has really been wonderful. Unfortunately, I’m not as young as I used to be and well, Terry is suffering from some memory loss and it’s not as easy for her to get around, so as much as I hate to do it, I think it’s time that Voyager find a new home.” I could tell that Charlie wasn’t overly excited by this dose of reality but like all good sailors, he was making the best of a situation that was less than perfect.

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Terry kicked back, enjoying the great cockpit of the Sun Odyssey 43. “Spending time aboard is always wonderful!”

As we were wrapping up our conversation, I commented that while it’s sad to be forced to sell Voyager at least you bought her in the first place, outfitted her with the best gear possible, threw off the lines and realized your dream of going cruising; so many people never get that far. He agreed with me but I couldn’t help hear a little disappointment in his voice.

There’s an old saying that’s been around forever that the two best days in a boat owner’s life is the day he buys the boat and the day he sells it. It’s a humorous saying but for those us us who really love the lifestyle, it simply isn’t true. The story of Voyager is one of both the bitter and the sweet. Thankfully, there’s a lot more sweet than bitter and that has made all the difference.

On we go….

P.S. Voyager has been listed for sale with Florida Coast Marine Yacht Sales located in Harbortown, Marina, Ft. Pierce, FL. For anyone looking for a great boat with a great legacy, please contact Kim Korman at 772-489-0110 or by email at kkorman@fcmyachts.com.

Farewell Valerie Toomey and Bon Voyage

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Valerie Toomey at the helm of the Jeanneau 509 crossing the Gulf Stream to the Bahamas for a 2013 photo shoot

It is said that the true character of a company can be found in the people who work for it. Valerie Toomey joined Jeanneau America in 2010 bringing with her an over abundance of positive energy and a unique style all her own. Now, 5 years later, she leaves us… not for a bigger or better job or to seek out new opportunities, but to do something most of us who love spending time on the water only dream of, going cruising.

Beginning in July, Valerie along with her husband, syndicated cartoonist Jim Toomey, and their two children, Madeline age 12 and William age 10, will head to Les Sables-d’Olonne, France where they will move aboard their brand new Lagoon catamaran. From there, they’ll spend the next year (maybe more if Valerie gets her way. And she usually does!) cruising through the Mediterranean and eventually south across the Atlantic to the Caribbean. It will be a grand adventure I’m sure.

“When I started working for Jeanneau, I really wasn’t a sailor but over the past 5 years, after organizing numerous boat shows, photo shoots, owner’s parties and rendezvous’, I have learned a thing or two and discovered that I love sailing and being aboard a boat” Valerie says.

Pirate Night during the 2014 BVI Owner's Rendezvous (L-R: Rosie Rigaux, Catherine Guiader and Valerie)
Pirate Night during the 2012 BVI Owner’s Rendezvous (L-R: Rosie Rigaux, Catherine Guiader and Valerie Toomey)

It’s never easy to lose a good employee or say goodbye to a good friend. But the fact that Valerie is headed for an adventure that’s right out of one of our brochures, somehow makes it all a little bit easier to accept. So Bon Voyage Valerie Toomey and thanks for shining your light on Jeanneau. It’s been a great 5 years!

Valerie and her girls at the close of the 2013 Annapolis Sail Boat Show
Valerie and her girls at the close of the 2013 Annapolis Sailboat Show

On we go…

Sailing the Spanish Virgin Islands and Loving it!

A Jeanneau 469 chartered from Sail Caribe sails just of f Tamarindo Point near the western end of Culebra.
A Jeanneau 469 chartered from Sail Caribe sails just off Tamarindo Point near the western end of Culebra.

There’s no doubt that the British Virgin Islands offer some of the best cruising to be found anywhere on the planet. Plenty of breeze, easy-peasy navigation, good snorkeling, lots of good restaurants, and plenty of good harbors make the BVI a great choice for a winter’s sailing adventure. The only downside, if there is a downside, is that the place can get crowded, especially during peak season. And if you have sailed in the BVI already, it might be nice to try someplace different.

Spanish VirginsLocated slightly off the beaten track tucked snuggly between the US Virgin Islands and the eastern end of Puerto Rico, you’ll find another handful of islands commonly referred to as the Spanish Virgin Islands or Passage Islands. Ceded to the United States in 1898, the area is primarily made up of the islands of Culebra and Vieques but there are plenty of other surrounding islets and cays to explore. And while the British Virgin Islands are distinctively British, the Spanish Virgin Islands are distinctively Spanish. You don’t hear about these islands that much but for anyone looking to escape the crowds of the BVI and try something new, they are well worth checking out which my family and I discovered firsthand on a recent charter to these simple and unspoiled islands.

We began our sailing adventure from the town of Fajardo on the very eastern end of Puerto Rico where we picked up our boat, a Jeanneau 409 called Island Girl that we chartered from Sail Caribe based out of the very nice marina of Puerto del Rey. One big advantage of sailing out of Puerto Rico that is realized right off the bat is cost. In my case, as a family of 5, we flew on Southwest direct from Baltimore to San Juan for about $400/ person or $2,000 total. Had we gone on to fly to Beef Island on Tortola in the BVI, we would be looking at an additional $2,000. That’s a whopping 4K just in air fare, a hefty amount for the average family.

After a brief introduction to the boat and a good chart briefing, we hoisted the sails and headed for Culebra. If there is a downside or should I say inconvenience to sailing in the Spanish Virgins, it is that every destination is up-wind from Fajardo making for a sometimes long and tough beat to windward. Such was the case for our first sail to Culebra located just about 18 miles dead up wind. With the winds blowing a steady 15 to 20 and seas running 3 to 4 feet, we took the advice of those in the know and motor-sailed our way to Culebra’s south shore and into one of the many recognized anchorages that can be found along the entire southern coast. I’m going to stop right here and say that another great thing about cruising in these islands is that there are plenty of moorings to be had, all of which are, now hold on to your Tilly Hats, FREE. That’s right free, as in no charge! How about that sport’s fans? A pretty good deal right?

My daughter Mollie enjoying a swim off the bow pulpit.
We have the anchorage all to ourselves as my daughter Mollie enjoys a swim off the bow pulpit.

Perhaps one of the sweetest harbors to drop anchor in is on the small island of Culebrita located just a stone’s throw to the east of Culebra. Here you’ll find pristine white sandy beaches, crystal clear turquoise blue water, and lots of healthy intact reefs teeming with fish, sea turtles, coral and conch. There are hills to climb, a great lighthouse to explore and the natural charm of what the BVI was like 40 years ago.

A killer sunset as seen from the island of Culebrita. It's hard to imagine anything much better than this.
A killer sunset as seen from the island of Culebrita. It’s hard to imagine anything much better than this.

We ended up spending 5 nights just cruising around from one quiet harbor to the next before ever going into Culebra’s main harbor and only town, Ensenada Honda. And you know what, we didn’t miss it.

A few years ago, we were fortunate enough to have had a similar experience cruising through the beautiful Apostle Islands on Lake Superior, where there were no beach bars, no on-shore boutiques, no restaurants, no nothing, except natural, unspoiled beauty. It was truly an awesome trip where we totally unplugged, enjoyed each other’s company and were happy just to be. This is what cruising is supposed to be all about and what you can find in the Spanish Virgins.

My soon to be 13 year old son Will enjoying Laura Hildebrand's best seller Seabiscut on the deck of the Jeanneau 409.
My soon to be 13-year-old son Will, enjoying Laura Hillenbrand’s best seller Seabiscut in Culebrita’s awesome and mostly deserted harbor.

At the end of the day, we never managed to get to Vieques. We could have but to be honest, we enjoyed sailing around Culebra and Culebrita so much, we figured we would just have to come back and check out Vieques the next time around.

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Enjoying another great sunset from the deck of the Jeanneau 409 in Almodovar Bay on Culebra

On the way back to Puerto del Ray, we made a final overnight stop on the small island of Palomino where we once again found a lovely harbor, free moorings, great snorkeling and as a bonus, a beautiful full moon to shine its light on us. What more could we ask for?

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Will, Mollie and Graham Fenn pause for a photo-op on our way up to visit the lighthouse on Culebrita.

For information on chartering in the Spanish Virgin Islands, please contact Sail Caribe. They have a nice fleet of both late-model Jeanneau monohulls and Lagoon cats to choose from. And once you leave the dock… simply unplug, relax and enjoy all that the Spanish Virgins have to offer.

On we go…

The Jeanneau 64 – A Champagne Toast to Trois Vignes

Coming down the dock and seeing Trois Vignes for the first time, a brand new Jeanneau 64, I found myself smiling and muttering the words, “we shall sell no wine before its time.” Elegantly dressed all in black with brilliant-white spars, white cabin top and honey-colored teak decks, Trois Vignes, which is French for three vines, looked stunning and ready for a glamorous evening out on the town.

The honey-colored teak deck really pops against the jet-black cap rail. If it's a yacht, and the 64 is, you gotta have teak decks. And why wouldn't you, they're gorgeous!
The honey-colored teak deck really pops against the jet-black cap rail. If it’s a yacht, and the 64 is, you gotta have teak decks. And why wouldn’t you, they’re gorgeous!

For John and Kris Palmer, the owners of Trois Vignes, their journey started 18 months ago in 2013 at the Annapolis Sailboat Show when they sat down with their dealer, Bob Reed of St. Clair Sailboat Center and Erik Stromberg, Jeanneau’s Sailboat Product Director to discuss the Jeanneau 64 in detail. I say in detail but at that time the details were in short supply since a boat had yet to actually be built. But Erik, in his usual good and informative style, along with some great artist renderings, was able to paint a clear picture as to what the 64 was all about. This, along with the fact that John and Kris were not new to Jeanneau, having owned a Jeanneau 54DS (also a Trois Vignes) for ten years, gave them the confidence that the Jeanneau 64 was ultimately going to be a very special 64 footer. Soon after this initial meeting, John laid down a deposit to reserve a hull and immediately listed his 54DS for sale.

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The original Trois Vignes, a 54DS anchored in the North Channel. The 54DS was an amazingly popular boat. Almost 400 were produced between 2002 – 2009. John and Kris bought theirs in 2003 and lovingly sailed it with their 3 children on Lake Michigan for 10 years before selling it to buy the 64. It now lives in California.

The first 64 to be built began production in November 2013. By April it was in the water and by July it was in Corsica where I had the pleasure of spending a week aboard it and helped to sail it to Marseille on the southern coast of France.

Living large aboard the Jeanneau 64 in Corsica during the official photo shoot. It's a rotten job but someone has to do it right?
Living large aboard the Jeanneau 64 in Corsica during the official photo shoot. It’s a rotten job but someone has to do it right?

It was in Marseille where John, Kris and their 3 kids saw the completed boat for the first time. I still remember the look of total astonishment wash across John’s face as he stood in the main salon for the first time. He only uttered a single word,“WOW.” Over the course of the next 8 months, John made several trips to the factory to meet with Erik Stromberg and check on the progress of his boat, hull #4. During these trips he experienced firsthand the complexity and the detailed engineering that goes into such a project. It’s truly mind-boggaling. By December, the new Trois Vignes was floating in the test tank and then just last week, after a visit to the paint shed, the Palmer’s new Jeanneau 64 was launched in the port of Les Sables d’Olonne in the Bay of Biscay on France’s west coast. It was a longtime coming, pretty much 18 months from concept to reality. But as Andrew Winch, the interior designer told me, “details make the project a success and details take time.”

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Aboard Trois Vignes, John Palmer (L) and Andrew Winch (R) talk about the details incorporated into the Jeanneau 64. As a side note, Andrew is getting his own 64 which is in production now. He has hull #11 which ironically is the same number that John’s 54DS was. Go figure right?

There is something completely and utterly rewarding about seeing the owner of a new boat step aboard it for the first time, especially when the boat we’re talking about is a 64 footer. So often they approach it slowly and with caution; taking it all in bit by bit so as not to miss anything. So was the case today when we welcomed John and Bob Reed aboard. It was a great moment. It had taken some time to get it right but we got there. And as we raised our glasses of real French Champagne to toast this new elegant lady, I once again found myself saying to myself, “we shall sell no wine before its time.” And with a name like Trois Vignes, that saying seems most appropriate.

A champagne toast with (L-R) Andrew Winch, John Palmer, Bob Reed, Erik Stromberg, and Paul Fenn
A champagne toast with (L-R) Andrew Winch, John Palmer, Bob Reed, Erik Stromberg, and Paul Fenn

Trois Vignes is scheduled to set sail in about a week, first to the island of Madeira off the coast of Portugal, then onto the Big Apple. From there, the mast will come out and the boat will travel through the Erie Barge Canal to Lake Ontario. She’ll eventually end up on the west coast of Michigan where she’ll be fondly admired by all who see her. What a life she’ll have!

On we go….

But, before you do, enjoy this short video of our day aboard Trois Vignes.

The Transquadra Race, Where Old Guys Rule

Transquadra 2014-2015

Last Sunday, my 11 year old daughter competed in a local indoor track meet. There were a ton of kids there of all ages competing in everything from the 100 meter dash to the 200 meter relay to the shot put to the long jump to the pole vault. Mollie ran the mile crossing the finish line in 6:35; not too bad considering she hasn’t been training.

The meet was billed as an “all comers” meet meaning that it was open to everyone, kids and adults alike. As a runner myself, I’ve competed in plenty of road-races where it’s common to see people who are well into their 70s and even their 80s truckin’ along in good style. I was surprised however when a group of mature and seasoned hurdlers stepped to the starting line and blasted down the track leaping along like a group of high-schoolers. It was a wonderful thing to see and proves the point that you’re only as old as you feel.

Like those older hurdlers, the Transquadra race is reserved for those sailors over the age of 40 who still lust for adventure and the feeling they get when racing under full sail across the open sea. The other requirement for racing in the Transquadra is that it is only open to those racing either single-handed or double-handed.

The race is broken into 2 legs. The first leg is held in the fall and begins in either St. Nazaire, France or Barcelona, Spain. Both legs finish on the island of Madera. The second leg started earlier this week and will finish on the French island of Martinique, some 3,500 miles away in the Caribbean.

YOLO at the start of the 2nd leg of the Transquadra race from Madera to Martinique.
YOLO at the start of the 2nd leg of the Transquadra race from Madera to Martinique.

Racing this year in the double-handed fleet aboard the Jeanneau Sun Fast 3600, YOLO, is my good friend and colleague, Jean-Francois de Premorel. In the first leg from St. Nazaire, Jean-Francois along with the help of Philippe Laperche finished 2nd, only 14 minutes behind the leader and getting 3rd on corrected time; not bad for a couple of old guys in a 7 day race!

“The Sun Fast 3600 proved incredibly stable and powerful in strong winds, and we were able to keep the spinnaker and mainsail under full sail at above 40 knots of wind.  Nothing broke, and we had very good camaraderie aboard, which made for a beautiful first leg of the race!” Jean-Francois de Premorel

YOLO, along with an impressive number of other Sun Fast 3200s and 3600s, left Madera this past Saturday and is currently in 2nd place. They are racing day and night and are due to arrive in Martinique sometime around February 7th. A race like this is not for the weak of heart but just like those older hurdlers racing down the track, they are only as old as they feel and they are going for it and loving every second of their journey.

On we go…

I invite you to track YOLOs progress at www.transquadra.com/positions.php

The Jeanneau 64 – You Gotta See it to Believe it

The Newly painted Jeanneau 64, Trois Vignes, sits in the factory Poieter.
Dressed all in black, the newly painted Jeanneau 64, Trois Vignes, sits at the factory in Poiré. She is scheduled to sail in mid-March from Les Sables- d’Olonne to Chicago by way of the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Just about a year ago, I took a trip to France to the town of Le Poiré Sur Vie in the Vendee region to see the first 64 being built. As you can easily imagine, building a 64 foot sailing yacht is not exactly a small accomplishment and in fact due to the dip in the economy, the project had been started and stopped more than once. Seeing the boat for the first time had been impressive. Construction had been about two-thirds of the way along and while the deck had not yet been installed, a good part of the interior had been. Seeing the boat at this stage of the build process was ideal because it provided an unobstructed view into the hull and all the equipment that is required on a boat of this size; generator, engine, water-maker, batteries, washer/dryer, wine cooler, etc. It was pretty much all installed and easy to see.

The true guts of the boat were easy to see and understand at this stage of construction.
The true guts of the boat were easy to see and understand at this stage of construction. You can see much of the front cabin was installed at this point.

Fast forward six months to June 2014 and that same boat, hull #1, was now strutting its stuff around the island of Corsica in the Mediterranee. Once again I was fortunate enough to travel to Europe to see this boat and actually got the chance to help sail it from Corsica to Marseille, about a 24 hour passage. It was an amazing feeling to see and sail the finished product after seeing it on the production line with all its guts hanging out just 6 months before. Right from the beginning I was totally awed by this yacht from her gracious lines to her sailing characteristics to her interior accommodations to her overall quality. It was truly Love at First Sight!

With the light just starting to fade, the Jeanneau 64 sits quietly at anchor off the coast of Corsica
With the light just starting to fade, the Jeanneau 64 sits quietly at anchor in a snug little harbor just off the coast of Corsica.

Fast forward again to last month when I made A Return Trip to Le Poiré to again visit the 64 on the production line. This time, instead of seeing just one boat under production, there were more like four or five. These boats were all in various stages of construction from the very beginnings to pretty much finished and ready to go. What’s more, I learned that 20 boats had already been sold and that the lead-time to get a boat was now stretching out some 18 months. It was also interesting to learn that many of the 64s that have already been sold were going to current Jeanneau owners, especially to owners of the extremely popular Jeanneau 54DS. I found this to be a great testament to the brand, the company, and to the Jeanneau staff. The bottom line is that anyone looking to purchase a 64 foot yacht and spend between one and two million dollars is going to look around at other boats and the fact that so many of these people chose the Jeanneau 64 is really quite a compliment.

The 64 starts life out in the form of 2 separate hull molds. They are each laid up with fiberglass cloth, joined together and infused with resin. The 64 starts life out in the form of 2 separate hull molds. They are each laid up with fiberglass cloth then joined together and infused with resin. From here, the true building begins.
The 64 starts life out in the form of 2 separate hull molds. Each are laid up with fiberglass cloth then joined together and infused with resin. It’s quite a process with first-rate results.

One of the major selling points of the 64 is that the boat has been designed and engineered for choice. What this essentially means is that a number of well-thought-out, highly engineered layouts and features have been pre-designed giving customers a wide choice of interior configurations and options to choose from. And because these were all engineered into the design ahead of time, it literally saves thousands of dollars of expense allowing the boat to be sold at a price well under that of other yachts of this size and quality.

Working for Jeanneau as I do, I have probably visited the factory at least 50 times over the past 18 years. And while seeing a 36 footer roll down the production line is one thing, seeing a 64 go together is quite another. I’m biased I know but I have to say with complete sincerity, the 64 is one impressive machine. But as the title of this story suggests, you gotta see it to believe it.

On we go…

P.S. Stay tuned for more on the 64 when I travel back to France in early March for the christening of the Palmer’s 64, Trois Vignes and her send-off across the Atlantic.

The Fenn Family gets a Lesson in Boat Building 101

Take a stroll to the waters’ edge of any major harbor and you’re sure to see more than a few boats tooling around or sitting at the dock. And while seeing boats on the water is a common sight, seeing them in a production plant is a different story. So when my family and I found ourselves in Florence, SC for the night, just 40 minutes away from the factory that builds four of our boats; the Sun Odyssey 379, 409, 41DS and 44DS, it only seemed logical that we should swing by, say hello to the team and learn a few things about how these babies go together.

Located in Marion, South Carolina, BGM (short for Beneteau Group Manufacturing) builds both the Beneteau and the Jeanneau brand of sailboats. At one time pretty much 100% of the boats produced here were just for North America but today, a few of the models, such as the Jeanneau 41DS and 44DS are actually produced and exported for the world market.

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My wife Kim with my 3 kids, Graham, Mollie and Will in front of a newly moulded hull outside the cutting room.

 

Since every new boat begins by first moulding a hull, it seemed logical that the mould room is where we should begin our tour. The moulds themselves are extremely expensive to make, like several hundred thousand dollars expensive. The mould has to be perfect because any imperfection in the mould will show up in the finished piece, i.e. the hull. Step one is to coat the inside of the mould with gelcoat. The gelcoat is a very hard, high-quality finish that is what you see on the outside of the boat after the hull comes out of the mould. Once the gelcoat has been applied, pieces of fiberglass cloth and resin are methodically laid out, one on top of the other to form a solid laminate. Once dried, the hull is removed from the mould and voila, you have something that looks pretty much like the beginnings of a boat.

The finished hull is then moved to the cutting room where holes for such things as ports, windows, hatches and thru-hulls are precisely cut for installation of the actual hardware later on in the production process.

Mollie and Graham stand alongside a 44DS where the deck is all staged for being permanently installed.
Mollie and Graham stand alongside a 44DS where the deck is all staged for being permanently installed.

The boat really starts to come together once it moves onto the actual production line. Because it’s here where the real guts of the boat are installed. This includes bulkheads (for structure), plumbing lines, electrical systems, pumps, water heaters, fuel tanks, water tanks, the engine, sound systems, head compartments, galley compartments, and pretty much everything else. It’s a slick system because at this point in the building process the deck is still uninstalled making access into the boat incredibly easy. 20 years ago this was not the case. Back then the deck went on very early in the production process making installations difficult and slow and often resulted in the bulkheads getting damaged in the process.

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Will pauses to check out one of the work stations on the floor of the plant. There is still a lot of handwork done here that takes both skill and experience.

Something important to keep in mind and that we learned during our visit, is before any of the bulkheads can be installed, they first have to be cut, finished and assembled. This is all done on site with the help of some pretty impressive equipment such as the computerized, programmable table saw and automated varnish application machine. In addition, all the equipment to be installed, and I mean everything, has to be properly labeled and on site so the production stays on schedule.

The production line itself is always a beehive of activity with plenty of workers coming and going, installing this and that along the way. Once the installations are complete, the only thing left to do is to drop on the deck. “Wait a minute, where does the deck come from,” asks my 8-year-old son Graham?

Graham Fenn stands along side the computerized table saw that cuts all the interior wood with tremendous precision.
Graham Fenn stands along side the computerized table saw that cuts all the interior wood with tremendous precision.

OK, so while some people are moulding the hull, and other people are cutting and finishing the wood, and others are installing equipment, there are still others constructing the deck. The deck, like the hull is a moulded piece. But, unlike the hull which utilizes a system of “open moulding” the deck takes advantage of a more modern system of “closed moulding.” In a nutshell, the big difference between the two systems is that where open moulding uses just one mould and the resin applied for the most part by hand, closed moulding utilizes a two-part mould and a system know as resin injection where the resin or glue is injected into the mould at great pressure. Once the resin has cured or hardened, the mould is taken apart and what you have is a perfect moulded deck.

Once the deck is on, the boat is pretty close to being ready to go. Before it does that however, it first has to take a swim in the pool to make sure all the systems run correctly. It’s also here that we check for deck leaks by spraying the boat with water for several hours. The last step is to make sure the boat is clean and shines like new so there is a whole team who takes care of detailing the boat from stem to stern before the boat rolls.

One of the truly great perks that has come from working for Jeanneau for the past 17 years, has been exposing my young family to the exciting world of boats, boating, boat shows, cruising and sailing in general. We have sailed through the tropical islands of the Caribbean, cruised through the San Juan and Canadian Gulf Islands. sailed off the New England Coast, cruised through Key West and across Tampa Bay, and explored the unspoiled Apostle Islands on Lake Superior. We are lucky for sure. And now, thanks to the hardworking people in Marion, we also have a new appreciation of how these beautiful boats come together and all the care that goes into building them. To everyone at BGM, thanks for all you do!

On we go…

Underway on the Chesapeake Bay aboard the Jeanneau 41DS
The Fenn family underway on the Chesapeake Bay aboard the Marion built, Jeanneau 41DS.
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