Paul Fenn

The Jeanneau 64, Love at First Sight – Part 2 (sailing with Philippe Briand)

Whether sitting at anchor or under sail, the Jeanneau 64 is proving to be one sweet ticket to ride!

Our second day in Corsica was met with clear blue skies, plenty of sunshine but not a whole lot of breeze. We had made a plan the night before to rendezvous for lunch. I can tell you that as a long-time member of the Crack of Noon Club, lunchtime worked fine for me. It had been a late night and I for one was still suffering from jet-lag so not having to jump out of bed first thing in the morning was a welcome surprise. We all pretty much hooked up right on schedule and after a nice plate of moules frites (mussels and fries) and a cold Heineken, we were ready for a sail on the Jeanneau 64. We had just cast of the lines and begun to pull away from the dock when who should show up but Philippe Briand. We quickly backed up, hauled Philippe aboard and headed out of the harbor of Porto-Vecchio. Being in Corsica was one thing. Being in Corsica sailing on a brand spanking new 64 footer was even better. But sailing around Corsica aboard a new 64 footer with Philippe Briand the designer of the boat on board? This was pretty much over the top!

The Jeanneau 64 – hull #1, carries two fixed headsails. The outer sail is a 110% genoa on an electric furling system while the inner sail is a 90% self-tacking jib on a manual furling system. This is a very nice setup where the genoa can be used for lighter wind and the self-taking jib for heavy wind and where you find yourself doing a lot of tacking to windward. Hull #1 also has a code 0 which comes in very handy on light-air days when you’re looking for a little extra horsepower.

Jeanneau's Nick Harvey enjoys a spot on the bow of the 64 just in front of the Code 0
Jeanneau’s Nick Harvey enjoys a spot on the bow of the 64 just in front of the Code 0. Note the electric furling unit just behind the anchor which is standard equipment on the boat.

Soon after leaving the harbor we pulled out the main, unfurled the code 0 and went off on a close reach. The 64 has an incredibly big cockpit. In fact at one point, Erik Stromberg and I counted 17 people on board and we still had room for more. Life on deck is essentially separated into two zones with the aft part of the cockpit reserved for the operation of the boat and the forward section reserved for lounging and dining. I did a little bit of both!

Philippe Briand temporarily lost in thought and Jeanneau America's Valerie Toomey put the forward cockpit to good use during our brief but enjoyable sail
Philippe Briand (temporarily lost in thought) and Jeanneau America’s Valerie Toomey put the forward cockpit to good use during our brief but enjoyable sail. Notice how the cockpit tale is down on the port side making for a huge longing area but is up on the starboard side. This arrangement gives you lots of versatility depending on what you’re after at any given time, longing or dining.

The business end of the cockpit is clean and uncluttered. Because the 64 has an arch, the mainsheet traveler is overhead and completely out of the way. Also, trimming of the main benefits from a clever piece of technology in the form of a Harken electric winch that lives below the mast step and does the job of sheeting in and out the main at the touch of a button. Not only does this system make handling the main incredibly easy, it also completely eliminates having yards and yards of mainsheet in the cockpit. It’s really an awesome system!

DSC01894
Captain Fenn standing at the port helm of the Jeanneau 64. From here, the helmsman has complete control of the vessel whether navigating, trimming sails, motoring or dropping anchor. It can all be done from the vicinity of the duel helm stations.

Philippe Briand on What Makes a Yacht a Yacht:

Because this first sail was just with my fellow Jeanneau colleagues, it made for a very casual and enjoyable setting. It also allowed me some one on one time with Philippe to pick his brain about how the Jeanneau 64 came to be. One of the questions I was most interested in hearing his answer to was “what makes a yacht a yacht and not just another big boat?” When I put this question to him, he smiled broadly and said, “oh, let me think about that for a minute. It’s a good question” You would think that a guy that regularly designs super-yachts between 100′ – 250′ long would have an easy answer to this question but instead, he gave the question serious thought. After a few seconds he said, “a yacht provides the customer with the ability to have his fingerprints on the project. You have to view it more like a villa that is configured and outfitted to the owner’s taste. With a yacht, you have to make accommodations for the owner’s taste by providing more custom options.” “And how do you balance the fact that at the end of the day the 64 is still a production boat and not a custom boat” I asked. “Another good question,” he said. “The great thing about what Jeanneau offers to the customer, is a highly engineered design that allows for a variety of configurations and options that will meet 95% of the customers desires all at a price that doesn’t come anywhere close to a one-off custom yacht. I really think that more than the designers, more than the craftsman, it’s the engineers that should get the credit for the finished product. Without them, the boat would never have been built.” “So it sounds like Jeanneau is on the right track” I said. “Honestly, I think when it comes to modern boat building, it’s the only logical way to go.” Philippe concluded.

Valerie Toomey relaxes on the drop-down swim platform after taking a refreshing dip in the cool Medateranian Sea.
Valerie Toomey relaxes on the drop-down swim platform after taking a refreshing dip in the cool Mediterranean Sea.

We manged to find the time to drop anchor and take a swim before heading back to the dock. After-all, we wanted to test all aspects of the boat. While at anchor, Erik was lamenting to Philippe about how much it had cost him to outfit the boat with high-end pillows and comforters. “This stuff cost a small fortune” Erik said. “Of course” Philippe replied. “What did you expect, it’s A Yacht!” “Oh” I chimed in, “so the real difference between a yacht and a boat is that a yacht cost more?” Philippe smiled and laughed and said, “of course, that’s what makes a yacht so special!” I should have known!

Enjoying a cold Heineken on a beautiful day in Corsica aboard the Jeanneau 64
Just me enjoying a cold Heineken on a beautiful day in Corsica aboard the Jeanneau 64

The story continues at Love at First Sight – Part 3 when we set sail for some of Corsica’s most beautiful harbors for a photo shoot and then head offshore for an ocean passage to Marseille.

On we go….

5 thoughts on “The Jeanneau 64, Love at First Sight – Part 2 (sailing with Philippe Briand)”

  1. Hopefully next time you’ll have a bit more wind!! After all isn’t it important that yacht can sail well ?

    1. Good point Drew! Please watch for the next installment of this story as we make the 200 mile passage from Corsica to Marseilles. Boat sails like a dream!

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